Tag: Special Needs

My Tips To Help You Mentally Prepare for The Summer Holidays

The Summer holidays are almost upon us, or are already here for some of us. 6-8 long weeks stretching ahead. The thought of half term and especially the summer break can often feel so overwhelming and fill us with dread. Made especially challenging if you have a disabled child or like me a disabled child and two younger siblings. Eek.

The Summer Break Can Feel So Overwhelming

The methods I use to get into a positive state and to plan for meetings with Freddie’s medical and educational professionals are methods I employ to see me through the long summer break. I wanted to share some of those tips with you in the hope it might help ease some of the anxiety.

Planning

The first thing I do, in advance, is get planning. I enlist the help of the grandparents and take advantage of some ad-hoc sessions at nursery/preschool for the younger two. (What will I do when they are to old to go?) I chat to my friends and see who is around and book a few ‘play dates’ or coffee dates in. I know for many, there isn’t any family support close by and even getting out of the house can be a challenge but perhaps you have a local network of friends you could tap in to. Talking with your online network of friends is key as well but meeting in the flesh is really important if you can.

I make a list of all the free places and not too expensive places we could go to that are accessible enough for Freddie.

Each week I plan the following weeks meals using a family meal planner and I order everything I need online. It might seem boring but it saves masses of time and stress. One of the most annoying things for me is when I haven’t pre-planned what we are eating. I get to 4pm and the panic is on. The children are fractious and there is nothing but good old beans on toast for dinner, if we are lucky.

Food is Fuel

It is really important, of course, to feed our children healthy nutritious food, along with the odd ice-cream and lolly pop but it is also really important for us as parents and carers. At times like this, our energy levels are often very low. When Jago was a baby, I hadn’t got so far as to being this well organised. I was feeding him myself and all three were in nappies. It was total chaos and I was suffering from a sever lack of sleep every day. I was on my knees both physically and mentally by the end of the summer break. I knew I couldn’t be in that state again. So here are My Top Foods for Fuel.

Getting Organised

Getting organised is the key to making it work for me. Sounds obvious but I get all the children’s clothes out ready the night before and if we are going out, I pack the bag or the car the night before too. I’m still generally always a bit late but if I didn’t do this I would never get anywhere. Another great tool you can use is a space saving hanger. Plan out 6 days worth of outfits for your children and hang them all ready to go for the week ahead. This generally also ensures I have done one of the most boring tasks known to man before its too late, the clothes washing.

My Daily Ritual

Mental preparation is just as important as physical preparation. Each morning, if I can wake up before one of my children does, I spend just 15 minutes getting my head together. It helps set me up for the day and stay on top of the stress levels. Even if you do this at another point in the day, 15 minutes should be an achievable amount of time for everyone. I do still end up loosing my sh%t at times and I’m sure my neighbours think there is a fish wife living at our house between the hours of 5pm-7pm some evenings.

I stretch because my body gets so stiff with lifting and stress.

I ask myself “What 3 things am I grateful for today?” This is a quick one but it’s a perspective check. This year I learned that a girl I went to school with, 2 years younger than me, died from lung cancer. She was bright, inspirational and lovely and had so much to live for.

Each day, I am grateful to be alive.

Today, I’m also grateful for the memory of the few days respite we had recently with the sound of the waves and the heat of the sun. A little time to recharge.

When you are focusing on being grateful, it’s very difficult to be angry or frustrated at exactly the same time. So, if I’m feeling this way, I take a moment and focus on what’s great about today. It doesn’t have to be anything big, it might be that the sun is shining or you have got an hour out to yourself or your children have actually eaten all their breakfast without moaning.

What are you grateful for today?

It’s a buzz word but Mindfulness really works for me, even if I only have 3 minutes to spare rather than 10. If it’s all getting too much during the day and I can shut myself in the loo for 2 minutes to practice Mindfulness it helps to calm me. I use the Headspace App and it works really well. It takes a little practice but it is worth it. You can listen to the Founder of Headspace, Andy Puddicombe, talking about it on his TED talk.

I also try to approach each day in sections. The first section is all about getting up and ready for the day then next is the morning, then lunch time, the afternoon, tea time and bed time and then (Gin or Prosecco) the evening. If I think of it as a whole day or week stretching out ahead of me its just too much.

“His way of coping with the days was to think of activities as units of time, each unit consisting of about thirty minutes. Whole hours, he found, were more intimidating, and most things one could do in a day took half an hour.” Nick Hornby, About A Boy. 

 

Be Kind To Yourself

We also have a dog who needs walking. I try my best to take him out on my own, even if it means getting up a bit earlier before hubby goes to work. Not everyone has a dog and not everyone has a partner to share the load. If you can, during the day especially if it is hard to get out, try to take even just two opportunities to perhaps sit outside in the fresh air and drink a hot cup of tea or a cold drink. If you can’t physically get out, sit by an open windows and take a breath. The outdoors and fresh air is vital to mental health and a positive attitude so find a way that works for you.

If it has been a nightmare couple of hours and the children have been having a strop, once it has stopped try to let it go. It is in the past now. Perhaps a few minutes of Mindfulness and then focus on the present moment. It is easier  said than done, it takes practice and believe me, it doesn’t always work but it will at times.

Good luck for the holidays everyone. Enjoy all the moments you can.

 

P.S…

If you purchase anything via the links with Amazon in my blog posts, I receive a small commission at NO added cost to you. This just helps me a little to maintain the website and continue to provide useful and empowering resources for parents and carers of children with special needs and disabilities. Thank you. x

A Siblings Struggles

Sometimes siblings find home life a bit of challenge living with Special Needs. Bella certainly struggles at times and doesn’t always seem to know her role within the family. Freddie is older and yet ability wise he is so much younger so it can be confusing for her with a younger brother as well. She does act out at times at home (you can usually find me pulling my hair out drinking gin) and needs more mummy/daddy time but she is a brilliant, smart, funny and a loving daughter and sister. We had her report today from Pre-School and we were blown away. She has made so many friends, grown in confidence and ability and she is caring and fun. Reading all these wonderful things gives us some confidence that even though it can be tough at times for her, she is going to be ok and thrive. A true Wonder Woman. So proud of my beautiful Bella Boo. X

Chronic Sorrow

There is something about that term that really hits home with me. I came across it some time ago but one of my fellow SWAN UK parents shared an article on it again not so long ago. It’s been sitting in my thoughts for a while and then bam it hit me like a sledge hammer yesterday.

I was having an exciting and very purposeful coaching session in the morning and came away feeling fantastic and ready to crack on with more work towards my goal. As I was walking through town to the bank there was an elderly gentleman who’s mobility scooter had failed and he was stranded. Everybody just walked past even though he almost rolled into the road. Anyway, it turned out fine, with the help of two lovely men from a nearby shop we moved him to safety and security were going to help him get home. Positive outcome. 

Chronic Sorrow, your wondering where is the sorrow in this story? Well, on my way back to the car, I passed a small group of people in a bit of a commotion and I realised the group comprised of young adults with special needs and their carers. One of the girls was very distressed and everyone was looking confused and worried and passers by were staring.

There it was, smack right in the face, is this the future for my son?

A massive part of my vision for this this community we are building here is not just empowering us as parents and sharing ways of coping and being powerful but to have possibilities in place for our children to have a purpose in life. I’m not saying that the group of young adults I saw had no purpose in their lives but I hope for my son to have employment, friends, respect and a reason for getting up in the morning. To live happily in the community as my other children will. I see our children as children at school and in similar settings, mine is still young, but I don’t see them as adults out in the community very often and this creates a sadness and a worry for me.

Having a child with special needs and disabilities is amazing and rewarding but can often come with that Chronic Sorrow that really makes your heart break because you love them so much. Wishing life could be easier for them and for us as parents and their siblings. You put on the brave face and the warrior parent is active so family and friends and even you don’t always recognise it. Over time, acceptance falls and all of your love and determination kick in but it doesn’t take away that Chronic Sorrow.

That feeling may never go but there is a lot we can do to support each other, educate the world and put actions in place to help provide our children and adults with their own individual purpose.

As Tony Robbins would say, it about taking ‘massive action’ towards the goal. Now that I’ve picked myself up again that’s what I’m doing, taking ‘massive action’.

Susan Ellison Busch talks about Chronic Sorrow in her book, Yearning for Normal.

Photograph courtesy of Ali Ineson xx

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