Category: Emotional Resilience

When You Teach Your Child A New Swear Word!

By mid week of half term this week, I was totally and utterly mentally exhausted and had massive auditory overload. I think my name had already been said/whined about 6k times. None of them listen to anything I say. By the 8th time of “Please sit down and eat your tea” or “Please take your shoes off” or “Please get out of the bath” or “Get off your sister” or “Give it back to your brother” (you get the picture) I was pretty much loosing it.

To top it off, I’ve managed to ‘teach’ Bella to say bloody. In context. 😬 The words uttered were “Argh, this bloody Lego.”  as a half built something went crashing across the floor. Parenting WIN. Yay, go me. Oh dear! Hangs head in shame.

I wish I was one of those Earth mothers who got the whole week right, beautiful activities suitable for each child and nothing but fun and laughter. The kind who takes photos of their food maybe, for Facebook, or who always signs off with #soblessed. Come on! This is the real world. This is my real world of three children, one with special needs. Laughing, fighting, whining (A LOT), cuddles, tears (occasionally mine) and fun.

There are some fantastic, funny and lovely times but honestly, some moments are just soooooo hard. So hard in fact I decided to read a book I’ve had on my shelf for a little while The Yes Brain Child by Dr Daniel J. Siegel and Dr Tina Payne Bryson. I realised, as I was going through the book, that some of the techniques discussed are tactics I use mostly with Bella and actually for myself in prep for stressful situations, often pretty successfully. However, by Wednesday, I wasn’t in the right positive/resourceful state to access that knowledge in the moment so I had a total parenting fail. The whole day at every turn.
After Wednesday’s diabolical morning, I decided to get straight and start again. I tried the Yes Brain technique with Jago and bingo. It worked. I doubt it will work every time but by the end of this week I am feeling far more in control of myself and able to parent better. Sometimes life just gets a bit overwhelming there for a moment doesn’t it?

The great bits of this week. Bella learning to ride her bike and Freddie being able to participate in this regular family activity. Going to the theatre with friends to see The Ginger Bread Man and the smiles on the children’s faces. A very lovely friend taking time to check in with me, recognising  I was overloaded.
Seeing how pleased my grandparents were to spend a little time with the children. Taking Freddie to a friends party and seeing how much he truly enjoyed himself and how pleased his friends were to see him. It really made my heart swell. He cracked me up at the end. No inhibitions about asking if there was a party bag. Little monkey. I had a really great time with him.  Plus, Jago has taken to calling me ‘Queen Mummy’, got to love a Mummy’s boy. Big bonus at the end of the week, Ollie and I get to have Friday night curry and wine with good friends and the children on a sleepover at Gogoos to give us a nights respite.

Don’t you just love it when you take about ten photos and still can’t get all three to look at the camera and smile. 

Phew. A nice dog walk in between helps to clear the mind. Five minutes meditation in the shower with the door locked each morning and Prosecco. These things all help.

I love my spirited and challenging children. Must try harder to be calmer though. Lack of sleep doesn’t help. Think I might go to one of those strange gyms each week in the run up to the summer holidays where you can just sleep for an hour to prep myself.

Just having written down the good things that have happened this week has made it feel a lot better. If you are having a tough day, write down the good things that have happened and those things you are grateful for. It gives me great clarity.

I hope everyone has got through their half term in one piece. xx



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It’s Almost Impossible To Escape

October is a really shitty month for me. A difficult, sad and stressful month. The 23rd October brings around again the anniversary of my Dad dying, followed by his birthday on the 24th. A double whammy.

When I’m talking about Emotional Resilience, on here, Facebook or at my workshops, I am usually referencing it with regard to having a child with Special Needs. However, something I share is that it is also something I have been practicing in other areas of my life. Often that resilience is needed to cope with the big life events like watching your father die and at other times it’s dealing with smaller situations or perhaps how you allow others to make you feel.

Nine years on and in many ways, it doesn’t feel any easier. I’m not sure it ever will. However, I know the signs better now and have strategies to see me through. I arrived home from school drop off and walking the dog on wednesday morning. Ollie just knew, straight away, that I was crumbling. I hadn’t really been thinking about Dad or feeling sad but suddenly the swirl of emotion started to bubble up from deep inside. I totally believe having a god cry is essential. Let it all out and start again. Although, I hate crying because honestly, I don’t look or feel good for it. I’m one of those red, blotchy, puffy frog eye types of criers. Not attractive and requires multiple re-applications of make-up to look reasonable.


Can’t resist a cheesy 1980’s moustache & psychedelic shorts photo. Me and my Dad at the Duxford Air Show.

Within the Getting Your Voice Heard Workshops, I talk about getting into the right state to cope with upcoming events/meetings etc. Within that practice is understanding that we experience life with all of our senses – taste, sight, touch, smell and sound. This is also how we remember our experiences. That’s often why you will smell a fragrance and be reminded of a loved one or perhaps, like me, the smell of Skips reminds you of the time you ate too many as a child and vomited. Never ate them again I can assure you.

This is what was happening to me. Unfortunately my senses weren’t allowing me to get into a positive state this time. The whole month of October was spent going to and from the hospice on a daily basis. Everything about the month of October reminds me and takes me back to that point. Walking the dog, how the air smells, the mostly sunny days, dew on the grass, cool in the evening, conkers on the floor and the light of the day, the rapidly approaching decay of life and of season into Winter. It’s almost impossible to escape it.

So, although I am often taken by surprise, I am more aware and prepared for it. I advance book to see my Osteo, one of the only ways I can release the tension build up. I spend time with Ollie and the children because apart from the fact that I love them, it’s almost impossible to have two minutes to myself to get caught up in how I’m feeling. I have failed slightly this week but I’m conscious of getting an early night. Everything is so much harder to cope with when sleep deprived. I take big doses of vitamins,  try to eat well (on top of the chocolate for comfort) and drink more water. Seeing friends for Prosecco also seems to help. Who knew? Getting the balance of distraction and rest is key for me.

This is how I cope when I’m dealing with more stressful times with Freddie too, which is why we talk about all of these things to understand what emotional resilience is and why we need it.

The past few weeks have also required me to try to impart some of this to my four year old, Bella, as she started school this September. New environment, new friendship circles, new rules – new everything. It’s mostly extremely positive and exciting so far but unfortunately, there has been an older child who has been ‘picking on’ Bella and her classmates. Nothing particularly serious but a little daunting non the less when you are only four years old. We have talked about how she can handle it and what course of action to take. I too have, of course, raised it with her teacher. I hope I’m giving her the right tools to deal with it, especially if at any point it becomes more serious. Something I am incredibly mindful of though is that children and adults for that matter, rarely act out unless they are struggling. Perhaps the child is unhappy, worried or fearful about something and feels more in control when behaving in this way? Who knows? What I do know is that the child needs compassion and support. The earlier it is spotted and worked through, the better for everyone. I also know how I would feel if it was my child behaving in this way. I would be gutted. It’s possible for any child to start acting out for a whole variety of reasons. I’m conscious that being the sibling of a child with special needs brings with it many emotions and challenges. I can only do my best to give her the resilience tools she needs and hope for the best. If she was ‘picking on’ others I would hope for compassion towards her and to me as her mum until it could be resolved.

Emotional resilience is always a good thing to practice. We are human and humans suffer at times. We need compassion and ways to cope so that we can enjoy life during the fantastic times.

Keep an eye out for the next set of dates in November for both Getting Your Voice Heard – How to be a Velvet Bulldozer and Emotional Resilience – The Ebb & Flow of a Special Needs Parent, in conjunction with Entrust Care Partnership.